KENT WATER FILTER PRICE : KENT WATER


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Kent Water Filter Price





kent water filter price






    water filter
  • a filter to remove impurities from the water supply

  • A water filter removes impurities from water by means of a fine physical barrier, a chemical process or a biological process. Filters cleanse water to various extents for irrigation, drinking water, aquariums, and swimming pools.

  • (Water Filters) A water filter is required to remove parasite contamination in big city municipal water supplies, and growing concerns about well water contamination in rural areas. It does away with the inconvenience and expense of purchasing bottled water.





    price
  • monetary value: the property of having material worth (often indicated by the amount of money something would bring if sold); "the fluctuating monetary value of gold and silver"; "he puts a high price on his services"; "he couldn't calculate the cost of the collection"

  • determine the price of; "The grocer priced his wares high"

  • the amount of money needed to purchase something; "the price of gasoline"; "he got his new car on excellent terms"; "how much is the damage?"

  • Decide the amount required as payment for (something offered for sale)





    kent
  • A county on the southeastern coast of England; county town, Maidstone

  • a county in southeastern England on the English Channel; formerly an Anglo-Saxon kingdom, it was the first to be colonized by the Romans

  • (ken) cognizance: range of what one can know or understand; "beyond my ken"

  • United States painter noted for his woodcuts (1882-1971)











Domino Sugar Factory




Domino Sugar Factory





(Former) Havemeyers & Elder Filter, Pan and Finishing House, Later known as the American Sugar Refining Company and the Domino Sugar Corporation, East River, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

Sugar production was Brooklyn’s most important industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Of various factories that once lined the East River, the former Havemeyers & Elder Refinery, later known as the Domino Sugar Refinery, is the largest and most significant structure to survive. The three conjoined properties – the Filter House, Pan House, and Finishing House – are located on Kent Avenue in Williamsburg, between South 2nd Street and South 3rd Street. The Filter House, which was once the tallest structure on the Brooklyn waterfront, rises to a height of approximately 155 feet. The processing of the raw sugar began in this building, where it was mixed with water and filtered through canvas and charcoal. As foreign materials were removed, the solution flowed to the Pan House, a nine-story structure at the southwest corner of Kent Avenue and South 2nd Street. Then reduced to syrup, it was pumped to the Finishing House to be dried and graded for sale.

Frederick C. Havemeyer, Jr., son of the company’s founder, first began operating a refinery in Williamsburg during 1856. Raw sugar was supplied from America’s deep south, mainly Louisiana, and the Caribbean, where it was primarily harvested by slaves. Though slavery ended in the United States in 1865, it continued in Cuba, the world’s largest exporter of raw sugar, until 1886. Most accounts of the refinery state that the Filter, Pan & Finishing House were built to replace an earlier facility that was destroyed by fire. Research, however, indicates that plans for the Filter House had already been filed with the Brooklyn Bureau of Buildings two months earlier, in November 1881. This building, as well as the Pan & Finishing House, was designed by Frederick’s eldest son, Theodore A. Havemeyer, in association with Thomas Winslow and J. E. James, who are variously listed in contemporary journals as architects and builders.

Like many contemporary industrial buildings, it was designed in the American round-arch style, a variant of the German Rundbogenstil and the Romanesque Revival style. Rooted in practical needs, the new refinery was conceived to be as fireproof as possible, with iron columns, beams and girders, as well as four hundred electric lights. A large oval smokestack dominates the west facade of the Filter House, facing Manhattan. Though the base of the chimney is original, most of the section that rises above the roof was added following a major expansion during the 1920s. Planned to produce at least 1,200 tons of sugar each day, the refinery’s capacity gave the company a considerable competitive edge, allowing it to dominate the American market for several decades. This leverage also led to the creation of the Sugar Refineries Company in 1887. Originally consisting of as many as twenty firms, it was a monopoly that sought to control labor costs and prices.

Renamed the American Sugar Refining Company in 1891, the “Domino” brand name was introduced in 1901. The Williamsburg refinery was sold to Tate & Lyle in 1988 and renamed the Domino Sugar Corporation in 1991. In subsequent years, the company ceased refining raw sugar at this location and the three buildings became vacant. The plant closed in 2004 and the site was acquired by C. P. C. Resources, the development arm of the Community Preservation Corporation.

- From the 2007 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report











Domino Sugar Refinery




Domino  Sugar Refinery





Sugar production was Brooklyn’s most important industry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Of various factories that once lined the East River, the former Havemeyers & Elder Refinery, later known as the Domino Sugar Refinery, is the largest and most significant structure to survive. The three conjoined properties – the Filter House, Pan House, and Finishing House – are located on Kent Avenue in Williamsburg, between South 2nd Street and South 3rd Street. The Filter House, which was once the tallest structure on the Brooklyn waterfront, rises to a height of approximately 155 feet. The processing of the raw sugar began in this building, where it was mixed with water and filtered through canvas and charcoal. As foreign materials were removed, the solution flowed to the Pan House, a nine-story structure at the southwest corner of Kent Avenue and South 2nd Street. Then reduced to syrup, it was pumped to the Finishing House to be dried and graded for sale. Frederick C. Havemeyer, Jr., son of the company’s founder, first began operating a refinery in Williamsburg during 1856. Raw sugar was supplied from America’s deep south, mainly Louisiana, and the Caribbean, where it was primarily harvested by slaves. Though slavery ended in the United States in 1865, it continued in Cuba, the world’s largest exporter of raw sugar, until 1886. Most accounts of the refinery state that the Filter, Pan & Finishing House were built to replace an earlier facility that was destroyed by fire. Research, however, indicates that plans for the Filter House had already been filed with the Brooklyn Bureau of Buildings two months earlier, in November 1881. This building, as well as the Pan & Finishing House, was designed by Frederick’s eldest son, Theodore A. Havemeyer, in association with Thomas Winslow and J. E. James, who are variously listed in contemporary journals as architects and builders. Like many contemporary industrial buildings, it was designed in the American round-arch style, a variant of the German Rundbogenstil and the Romanesque Revival style. Rooted in practical needs, the new refinery was conceived to be as fireproof as possible, with iron columns, beams and girders, as well as four hundred electric lights. A large oval smokestack dominates the west facade of the Filter House, facing Manhattan. Though the base of the chimney is original, most of the section that rises above the roof was added following a major expansion during the 1920s. Planned to produce at least 1,200 tons of sugar each day, the refinery’s capacity gave the company a considerable competitive edge, allowing it to dominate the American market for several decades. This leverage also led to the creation of the Sugar Refineries Company in 1887. Originally consisting of as many as twenty firms, it was a monopoly that sought to control labor costs and prices. Renamed the American Sugar Refining Company in 1891, the “Domino” brand name was introduced in 1901. The Williamsburg refinery was sold to Tate & Lyle in 1988 and renamed the Domino Sugar Corporation in 1991. In subsequent years, the company ceased refining raw sugar at this location and the three buildings became vacant. The plant closed in 2004 and the site was acquired by C. P. C. Resources, the development arm of the Community Preservation Corporation.

- From the 2007 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report









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